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"A cleansing fire always burns little Mandus, but it purifies and it makes anew."
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Uncle, you must run, they are killing everyone!

Baki, to his uncle Faraj.

Baki is a supporting character in the Remember short story "Old Friends." He was Faraj's nephew and part of an uprising against the occupying French in Algiers.[1]

Information[]

Baki was a young Algerian man, he was a nephew to Faraj and was also politically active in the native resistance against the colonial French in the city of Algiers in 1839, sometime prior to early May.[1][2]

Events of "Old Friends"[]

Baki entered Faraj's abode along with three other rebels, in part to warn his uncle that the French soldiers were killing indiscriminately.[1] He was angry to find his uncle entertaining a white guest, Thurston Herbert. Faraj tried to calm Baki and explained to him that Herbert was English, not French, meaning he had nothing to do with the political situation in Algeria.[1] Baki was not swayed by this logic, asserting that Herbert was nevertheless European (and was ergo not to be trusted or fraternized with).[1]

The advance of French soldiers chasing down rebels in nearby streets and houses, following the rout by Captain Ambroise of rebels under Abd-al-Qadir Bahij at the docks, pressed the young men for time.[1] Baki took Herbert at knife-point as a hostage and pulled him outside, to use him as a bargaining chip against the waiting French soldiers.[1] Faraj followed them both outside, pleading with his nephew not to hurt Herbert.[1]

Baki demanded they lay down their weapons.[1] However, instead of backing off, the soldiers fired their weapons into the group, with Baki being presumably shot dead, and his uncle Faraj himself dying soon after from gunshot wounds.[1]

Quotes[]

  • « “Uncle, what are you doing? He is one of them!” »

Footnotes[]

  1. Algeria was a French colony from 1830–1848, and a full part of France proper 1848–1962, hence the use of the French tricolor flag to refer to Algerians of this time-period.

References[]

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